gms | German Medical Science

Fourth International Symposium and Workshops: Objective Measures in Cochlear Implants

Medical University of Hannover

01.06. bis 04.06.2005, Hannover

Lateralisation of speech processing in cochlear implant users

Meeting Abstract

  • K.M.J. Green - Department of Otolaryngology, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Manchester, UK
  • P.J. Julyan - North Western Medical Physics, and the Manchester PET Centre, Christie Hospital, Manchester, UK
  • D.L. Hastings - North Western Medical Physics, and the Manchester PET Centre, Christie Hospital, Manchester, UK
  • R.T. Ramsden - Department of Otolaryngology, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Manchester, UK

Medical University of Hannover, Department of Otolaryngology. Fourth International Symposium and Workshops: Objective Measures in Cochlear Implants. Hannover, 01.-04.06.2005. Düsseldorf, Köln: German Medical Science; 2005. Doc05omci064

Die elektronische Version dieses Artikels ist vollständig und ist verfügbar unter: http://www.egms.de/de/meetings/omci2005/05omci064.shtml

Veröffentlicht: 31. Mai 2005

© 2005 Green et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielf&aauml;ltigt, verbreitet und &oauml;ffentlich zug&aauml;nglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

Text

This study aimed to investigate hemispheric speech processing in cochlear implant users. Cortical activity resulting from auditory stimulation was measured using [18F]-FDG positron emission tomography. Eighteen adult cochlear implant users were studied over the course of 29 activation states. Four main effects were observed: (i) bilateral auditory cortical activation was present in all subjects; (ii) activity was greater in the left than the right primary areas; (iii) activity was greater in the association areas contralateral to the side of implantation; and (iv) visual cortical responses were higher in patients with left than right cochlear implants. These data demonstrate that there is no strong left hemisphere dominance for language in cochlear implant users, and suggest that lateralisation of association area speech processing shifts following cochlear implantation. The additional visual recruitment in the left implant users may be as a result of excessive demands on the speech processing abilities of the right auditory areas. In total, these findings provide evidence of the development of new speech processing strategies that occur following cochlear implantation.