gms | German Medical Science

Fourth International Symposium and Workshops: Objective Measures in Cochlear Implants

Medical University of Hannover

01.06. bis 04.06.2005, Hannover

Measurements of neural adaptation in subjects with cochlear implants

Meeting Abstract

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  • corresponding author N. Dillier - Laboratory of Experimental Audiology, University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland
  • W. Kong Lai - Laboratory of Experimental Audiology, University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland
  • M. Killian - Cochlear Technology Center, Mechelen, Belgium

Medical University of Hannover, Department of Otolaryngology. Fourth International Symposium and Workshops: Objective Measures in Cochlear Implants. Hannover, 01.-04.06.2005. Düsseldorf, Köln: German Medical Science; 2005. Doc05omci016

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Veröffentlicht: 31. Mai 2005

© 2005 Dillier et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielf&aauml;ltigt, verbreitet und &oauml;ffentlich zug&aauml;nglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

Text

Introduction

Recordings of compound action potentials are increasingly used in the clinical environment as valuable tools to determine the optimal parameters of the digital speech processors.

Materials and Methods

With the Nucleus Research Platform 8 (RP8/System 4) which includes an improved Neural Response Telemetry (NRT) system, featuring higher sampling rates, longer sampling windows, an amplifier with improved linearity, saturation recovery and noise immunity, finer gain adjustments as well as new artefact cancellation/reduction methods it is also possible to determine the detailed temporal pattern when stimulating the auditory nerve with long pulse trains.

Results

Response amplitude decrease and fluctuations have been observed which are dependent on the rate of stimulation and possibly patient variables.

Conclusions

Neural adaptation effects were determined in six experimental subjects until now for rates ranging from 10 pulses per second (pps) up to 2000 pps and for pulse train durations ranging from a few milliseconds up to several seconds.