gms | German Medical Science

83. Jahresversammlung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Heilkunde, Kopf- und Hals-Chirurgie e. V.

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Heilkunde, Kopf- und Hals-Chirurgie e. V.

16.05. - 20.05.2012, Mainz

Positional trainer: a new treatment for positional obstructive sleep apnea

Meeting Abstract

  • corresponding author Lideke Dun - Sint Lucas Andreas Hospital, Amsterdam, Holland
  • Kristel Meester - Sint Lucas Andreas Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Holland
  • Martin Laman - Sint Lucas Andreas Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Holland
  • Ton Hilgevoort - Sint Lucas Andreas Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Holland
  • Nico de Vries - Sint Lucas Andreas Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Holland

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Heilkunde, Kopf- und Hals-Chirurgie. 83. Jahresversammlung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Heilkunde, Kopf- und Hals-Chirurgie. Mainz, 16.-20.05.2012. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2012. Doc12hnod691

doi: 10.3205/12hnod691, urn:nbn:de:0183-12hnod6919

Veröffentlicht: 4. April 2012

© 2012 Dun et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielf&aauml;ltigt, verbreitet und &oauml;ffentlich zug&aauml;nglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

Text

Introduction: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a prevalent disorder which appears to be positional dependent (apnoea hypopnoea index-AHI- in supine position ≥ twice the AHI in other positions) in 56% of patients. The possible effect of positional therapy with other techniques than the ‘tennis ball technique’ has not been investigated thoroughly so far. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of the Sleep Position Trainer (SPT) in treating positional OSA without disturbance of the sleep quality.

Material and methods: 18 patients (15 men; mean age 52.6±9.6 years; mean body mass index 26.9±3.7 kg/m2) with positional OSA (mean AHI 17.4±6.8 events/h; mean AHI in supine position 37.1±14.3 events/h) underwent a 29±2 days of treatment at home with the SPT. The SPT is a sensor positioned in an elastic band attached around the body. The SPT measured the body position and vibrated when the patient lied in supine position. Subsequently, a polysomnography was repeated.

Results: Average use of the positional trainer was 27.2±2.8 days. The average proportion of supine position during the last 5 days of therapy (including the polysomnography night) was 3.3±10.8% of total sleep time, in comparison with 42.6±18.4% (p<0.001) at baseline. AHI at follow-up was 7.3±4.8 events/h (p<0.001). Sleeping efficiency at follow-up was 82.8±10.7, whereas at baseline it was 87.1±7.8% (p<0.05).

Conclusions: The SPT appears to have good compliance and can significantly reduce the proportion of supine sleep position and the AHI in patients with positional OSA.