gms | German Medical Science

83. Jahresversammlung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Heilkunde, Kopf- und Hals-Chirurgie e. V.

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Heilkunde, Kopf- und Hals-Chirurgie e. V.

16.05. - 20.05.2012, Mainz

Effect of Upper Airway Stimulation on Snoring in Patients with Moderate-to-Severe OSA

Meeting Abstract

  • corresponding author Joachim T. Maurer - Univ. HNO-Klinik, Mannheim, Germany
  • presenting/speaker Clemens Anders - Univ. HNO-Klinik, Mannheim, Germany
  • presenting/speaker Winfried Hohenhorst - Alfried Krupp Krh., HNO-Klinik, Essen, Germany
  • presenting/speaker Lennart Knaack - Intersom, Köln, Germany

German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery. 83rd Annual Meeting of the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery. Mainz, 16.-20.05.2012. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2012. Doc12hno65

DOI: 10.3205/12hno65, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-12hno650

Veröffentlicht: 23. Juli 2012

© 2012 Maurer et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielfältigt, verbreitet und öffentlich zugänglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

Text

Background: Previous studies showed that electrical stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve can improve obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). However, loud snoring may significantly impact quality of life in patients with OSAS, and the effect of stimulation on snoring is unknown.

Methods: Upper Airway Stimulation (Inspire Medical Systems, Inc) systems were implanted in moderate-to-severe OSA patients who failed, or were intolerant of CPAP. The system is intended to reduce sleep apnea by stimulating the hypoglossal nerve to advance the tongue-base. Apnea hypopnea index (AHI, events/hr) was collected using lab-based polysomnography at pre-implant and at 2, 4 and 6-months post-implant. Snoring was assessed by a 5-level categories (no, soft, loud, very intense snoring, and intolerable by bed-partner) reported by both subject and bed-partner.

Results: Nine subjects were implanted, and completed month-6 visit. All nine subjects reported loud snoring at pre-implant. At the last visit, 4 subjects reduced from loud to no snoring, 4 subjects reduced from loud to soft snoring, and one subject reported no change. Reports from bed-partner were similar. The average AHI among the nine subjects reduced from 39.4 ± 9.3 (mean ± sd) to 16.7 ± 21.7 (p<0.05). OSA was eliminated in 7 of nine patients with stimulation.

Conclusion: Preliminary findings suggest that upper airway stimulation improves snoring along with improvement of sleep disordered breathing in patients with moderate-to-sever OSA. Further studies are needed to investigate any possible correlation between change of OSA and snoring.