gms | German Medical Science

83. Jahresversammlung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Heilkunde, Kopf- und Hals-Chirurgie e. V.

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Heilkunde, Kopf- und Hals-Chirurgie e. V.

16.05. - 20.05.2012, Mainz

Osteomyelitis of the frontal bone secondary to acute sinusitis in a 5-year-old boy

Meeting Abstract

German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery. 83rd Annual Meeting of the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery. Mainz, 16.-20.05.2012. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2012. Doc12hno52

DOI: 10.3205/12hno52, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-12hno529

Veröffentlicht: 23. Juli 2012

© 2012 Ondruschka et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielfältigt, verbreitet und öffentlich zugänglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

Text

Introduction: Osteomyelitis of the frontal bone is a rare sinunasal complication in childhood. Possible development of an epidural or intracerebral abscess formation requires earliest operation. The combination of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging seem to be necessary to get optimal overview of all bone and brain alterations.

Case history: A 5-year-old boy complaining of rapid ongoing swelling of his forehead was admitted to our hospital. A few days ago he presented a slight respiratory infection. During physical examination a dolent, doughy frontal fluctuation about 5 x 5 cm was detected, no other abnormalities. Neither meningism nor pathological rhinorrhea did occur. The boy was in a good general condition. Computed tomography revealed a liquid frontal alteration and osteolytic change of the external and internal frontal tabulae. Existing sinus of the right side had been involved. The MRI demonstrated a right frontal meningeal enhancement. Suspected osteomyelitis of the frontal bone including right epidural abscess formation due to an acute pansinusitis lead to a surgical treatment.

Conclusion: Even in not yet present sinuses a simple respiratory infection may lead to an osteomyelitis of the frontal bone via a retrograde thrombophlebitis. Secondary to its distincted spongiosa the frontal bone seems to be predestinated for osteolytic alterations.