gms | German Medical Science

81. Jahresversammlung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Heilkunde, Kopf- und Hals-Chirurgie e. V.

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Heilkunde, Kopf- und Hals-Chirurgie e. V.

12.05. - 16.05.2010, Wiesbaden

Acceptance and side effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in patients with obstructive sleep apnea

Meeting Abstract

  • corresponding author presenting/speaker Clemens Heiser - Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Mannheim, Germany
  • J. Ulrich Sommer - Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Mannheim, Germany
  • Jens Stern-Sträter - Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Mannheim, Germany
  • Karl Hörmann - Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Mannheim, Germany
  • Joachim T. Maurer - Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Mannheim, Germany
  • Boris A. Stuck - Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Mannheim, Germany

German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery. 81st Annual Meeting of the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery. Wiesbaden, 12.-16.05.2010. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2010. Doc10hno108

DOI: 10.3205/10hno108, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-10hno1084

Veröffentlicht: 6. Juli 2010

© 2010 Heiser et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielfältigt, verbreitet und öffentlich zugänglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

Text

Introduction: Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the gold standard in therapy of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The compliance of this therapy is limited to numerous side effects, especially regarding complaints of nasal and upper airway symptoms. Humidified CPAP is potentially able to reduce these symptoms. The aim of the study is to compare CPAP with and without airway humidification regarding side effects and acceptance of nocturnal ventilation.

Material & methods: 74 patients (59±12 years, 54% f, 46% m) were included in this prospective trial and randomized to CPAP without (group 1; n=35) or with humidifier (group 2; n=39). Questionnaires regarding typical symptoms and side effects (visual analog scale) before and 3 months after therapy were completed by patients. The questionnaires documented the acceptance as well as the subjective and objective compliance (operating hours).

Results: In both groups 35% of patients discontinued therapy within the first 3 months. 67% of patients in group 1 and 91% in group 2 indicated to use CPAP every night (p<0.05). Operating hours in group 1 were 385±203 and in group 2 424±172, the difference was not statistically significant. Changes in nasal symptoms (e.g. dry nose) were similar in both groups.

Conclusion: The acceptance and objective compliance of CPAP seems to be independent of the prescription of a humidifier. The symptoms do not differ between both groups. The regularity of use (subjective compliance) can be increased by a humidifier, but the basically prescription of humidifier seems not to be justified.