gms | German Medical Science

81. Jahresversammlung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Heilkunde, Kopf- und Hals-Chirurgie e. V.

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Heilkunde, Kopf- und Hals-Chirurgie e. V.

12.05. - 16.05.2010, Wiesbaden

Early diagnosis of permanent glue ear by universal newborn hearing screening (UNHS)

Meeting Abstract

Suche in Medline nach

  • corresponding author presenting/speaker Friedrich Scholz - HNO Universitätsklinik, Magdeburg, Germany
  • Wilma Vorwerk - HNO Universitätsklinik, Magdeburg, Germany
  • Christoph Arens - HNO Universitätsklinik, Magdeburg, Germany
  • Ulrich Vorwerk - HNO Universitätsklinik, Magdeburg, Germany

German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery. 81st Annual Meeting of the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery. Wiesbaden, 12.-16.05.2010. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2010. Doc10hno069

DOI: 10.3205/10hno069, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-10hno0692

Veröffentlicht: 6. Juli 2010

© 2010 Scholz et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielfältigt, verbreitet und öffentlich zugänglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

Text

The introduction of a universal newborn hearing screening is an effective tool for the diagnosis of sensorineural hearing loss. Additionally, it also helps to make an earlier diagnosis in permanent secretory otitis media with effusion (glue ear). Up till now these children are often recognized by speech development disorders or auditive processing and perception disorders with consecutive school failure. An early diagnosis of these patients may help to prevent these long lasting consequences.

Between January 2007 and November 2008 290 infants were transferred to our institution for confirmation diagnostics after failed UNHS. In 220 of them normal hearing by TEOAE and AABR rescreening were found. 20 had a sensorineural hearing loss, and in 50 a glue ear was diagnosed.

In the follow up of 50 patients with glue ear 15 did not show spontaneous resolution of the fluid. 5 had a syndrome or dysplasia of the facial skull (Goldenhar-Syndrome, Trisomia 21, palatal cleft, frontonasal dysplasia). The other 10 did not present such symptoms.

13 children with permanent glue ear underwent surgical therapy (adenotomy with grommet insertion or grommet insertion only). In the postoperative follow up 8 patients demonstrated normal hearing abilities, 2 presented recurrent glue ear and received a second surgery, 2 had only slight hearing impairment (<20 dB) and one child with trisomia 21 was supplied with a hearing device.

We conclude that UNHS is able to diagnose and treat children with permanent glue ear at an earlier time.