gms | German Medical Science

76. Jahresversammlung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Heilkunde, Kopf- und Hals-Chirurgie e. V.

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Heilkunde, Kopf- und Hals-Chirurgie e. V.

04.05. - 08.05.2005, Erfurt

Facial injuries to a small child due to dog bites

Meeting Abstract

Suche in Medline nach

  • corresponding author Anke Hirschfelder - Hals-, Nasen-, Ohrenklinik Charité, Campus Virchow Klinikum, Berlin
  • Andreas Schmeling - Institut für Rechtsmedizin Charité, Berlin
  • Heidi Olze - Hals-, Nasen-, Ohrenklinik Charité, Campus Virchow Klinikum, Berlin

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Heilkunde, Kopf- und Hals-Chirurgie. 76. Jahresversammlung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Heilkunde, Kopf- und Hals-Chirurgie e.V.. Erfurt, 04.-08.05.2005. Düsseldorf, Köln: German Medical Science; 2005. Doc05hno364

Die elektronische Version dieses Artikels ist vollständig und ist verfügbar unter: http://www.egms.de/de/meetings/hno2005/05hno247.shtml

Veröffentlicht: 22. September 2005

© 2005 Hirschfelder et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielf&aauml;ltigt, verbreitet und &oauml;ffentlich zug&aauml;nglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

Text

Injuries caused by biting dogs, especially “fighter breeds” or “dangerous dogs”, have attracted considerable media attention in recent years and are hence a focus of public interest. Preventing dog bites as injuries sustained in public spaces should be seen as an important medical task.

This poster describes the facial injuries sustained by a two-year-old boy, including partial avulsion of nose tissue, when he was bitten by an American Staffordshire Terrier. The course of the incident was typical, as the family dog attacked after the child apparently attempted to take away its biscuit. The wounds observed during examination of the child tallied easily with the assumption that they had been caused by dog bites. There was no acute threat to life, although a lack of medical attention might have resulted in potentially fatal loss of blood or infection of the wound. Lasting damage has remained in the form of facial scars and defects to the right nostril and the tip of the nose.

Apart from securing documentation that might be necessary for use in court, the treating physician has an important role to play in terms of preventive medicine. The forensic conclusions derived from a case review of injuries sustained as a result of dog bites can make a major contribution to preventing such injuries.