gms | German Medical Science

15. Grazer Konferenz – Qualität der Lehre: Teaching and Learning – Expanding our Resources

28. - 30. April 2011 Wien, Österreich

Needle stick injuries among medical students: The role of medical curricula

Poster

  • corresponding author Martin Hoenigl - Medical University of Graz, Division of Pulmonology, Graz, Austria
  • author Helmut J.F. Salzer - Medical University of Graz, Division of Pulmonology, Graz, Austria
  • Katharina Seeber - AGES Pharm med, Vienna, Austria
  • author Thomas Valetin - Medical University of Graz, Division of Pulmonology, Graz, Austria
  • author Robert Krause - Medical University of Graz, Division of Pulmonology, Graz, Austria

15. Grazer Konferenz – Qualität der Lehre: Teaching and Learning – expanding our resources. Wien, Österreich, 28.-30.04.2011. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2012. Doc11grako21

DOI: 10.3205/11grako21, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-11grako215

Veröffentlicht: 25. April 2012

© 2012 Hoenigl et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielfältigt, verbreitet und öffentlich zugänglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

Poster

Recent studies showed that the frequency of nonreported needlestick injuries is alarmingly high, especially among medical students.

1200 medical students in the final year of medical education from 11 medical universities including 3 from Austria, 4 from Germany, and 4 from the United Kingdom (UK) were invited to participate in an open online survey.

In the UK, any form of education regarding needlestick injuries reduced the actual risk of experiencing a needlestick injury significantly. In contrast, respondents from Austria and Germany had to attend at least a lecture above 30 minutes of time or a theoretical and practical training to reduce the risk of a needlestick injury significantly, when compared to students who received either a short briefing or no education at all.

Introduction of improved medical curricula including a practical training regarding needle stick injuries may have a significant impact on the frequency of needlestick injuries contributing to a more efficient prevention of occupational infections in medical students.