gms | German Medical Science

14. Grazer Konferenz – Qualität der Lehre: New Horizons in Teaching and Learning

22. - 24.04.2010, Wien, Österreich

Students' opinions on gender-specific medicine in their medical education: A survey at the medical university of vienna

Poster

Suche in Medline nach

  • corresponding author presenting/speaker Jürgen Harreiter - Medical University of Vienna, Departmet für medizinische Aus- und Weiterbildung, Vienna, Austria
  • author Hubert Wiener - Medical University of Vienna, Departmet für medizinische Aus- und Weiterbildung, Vienna, Austria
  • author Herbert Plass - Medical University of Vienna, Departmet für medizinische Aus- und Weiterbildung, Vienna, Austria

14. Grazer Konferenz – Qualität der Lehre: New Horizons in Teaching and Learning. Wien, Österreich, 22.-24.04.2010. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2010. Doc10grako21

DOI: 10.3205/10grako21, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-10grako210

Veröffentlicht: 18. November 2010

© 2010 Harreiter et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielfältigt, verbreitet und öffentlich zugänglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

Poster

Introduction: As part of the diploma thesis Web Based Training with Moodle: Genderdifferences in Action of Drugs, a survey among students of the Medical University of Vienna (MUV) concerning the implementation of Gender-specific medicine in the curriculum was performed.

Methods: 8500 students at the MUV received an email invitation to participate in an anonymous online survey. 795 accepted this invitation and 642 (81,6%) questionaires were completed. To achieve representative results (representativeness = 95%) a minimum of 368 answers out of 8500 respondents was necessary.

The questionaire contained questions concerning gender-specific medicine (GM) to be answered on a Likert-scale from 1 to 6 (1 = dissatisfied/not true, 6 = satisfied/true). The survey was conducted in the period from April to May 2009.

Results: Students (n=642) rate the importance of gender-specific medicine fairly high (4.02±0.06), and the importance to know about gender-specific medicine as a medical doctor even higher (4.49±0,05). Further implementation of gender-relevant topics into the curriculum appears less important (3.64±0.06). Self-directed learning for this topic is judged neutrally (3.40±0.05).

Female students (n=370) consider gender-specific medicine significantly more important (female 4.25±0.08 vs. male 3.69 ± 0.10, p<0.05) than their male collegues (n=272). Female students would like to be better educated on this subject (female 3.9±4 0.08 vs. Male 3.23±0.09, p=<0.05) and judge the importance to be informed about gender-specific topics as a MD higher (female 4.68±0.07 vs. male 4.22±0.09, p=<0.05) than male students.

Students from the "old" curriculum (subject-based, n=76) see more necessity for gender-specific education than students from "new" curriculum (integrated, n=566); (old 4.33±0.15 vs. new 3.55±0.06, p=<0.05). In contrast self-directed learning for gender-specific knowledge is judged more important by students of the new curriculum (old 2.68± 0.17 vs. new 3.50±0.06, p=<0.05).

Conclusion: Students consider gender-specific medicine as important but adequately covered in their medical education at the Medical University of Vienna.