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GMDS 2012: 57. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Medizinische Informatik, Biometrie und Epidemiologie e. V. (GMDS)

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Medizinische Informatik, Biometrie und Epidemiologie

16. - 20.09.2012, Braunschweig

Association of adiponectin with markers of body composition and metabolic syndrome in adults and children: 8-year follow-up of a birth cohort

Meeting Abstract

  • Ines Florath - DKFZ, Heidelberg, Deutschland
  • Stephanie Brandt - Division of Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes, Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Ulm University, Ulm, Deutschland
  • Melanie Weck - DKFZ, Heidelberg, Deutschland
  • Dietrich Rothenbacher - Institute of Epidemiology and Medical Biometry, Ulm University, Ulm, Deutschland
  • Martin Wabitsch - Division of Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes, Division of Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes, Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Ulm University, Ulm, Deutschland
  • Hermann Brenner - DKFZ, Heidelberg, Deutschland

GMDS 2012. 57. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Medizinische Informatik, Biometrie und Epidemiologie e.V. (GMDS). Braunschweig, 16.-20.09.2012. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2012. Doc12gmds171

DOI: 10.3205/12gmds171, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-12gmds1717

Veröffentlicht: 13. September 2012

© 2012 Florath et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielfältigt, verbreitet und öffentlich zugänglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

Text

Introduction: Adiponectin is considered to effect systemic inflammation and glucose and lipid metabolism and therefore an association with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and relevance in predicting cardiovascular disease has been suggested. However current study results are controversial and the role of adiponectin in predicting metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease is still discussed.

Methods: The analysis is based on the Ulm Birth Cohort Study of 1,045 children born in 2,000 with annual/biennial follow-up. The eight-year-old children and their parents were invited to a comprehensive clinical examination. The mean age of mothers and fathers at this time was 40 and 42, respectively. Adiponectin was measured in 446 children, 427 mothers and 259 fathers at 8-year follow-up with 416 additional adiponectin measurements in cord blood samples. Data were analysed using Wilcoxon, Chi and Fisher’s exact tests and (partial) Spearman correlation coefficients.

Results: According to WHO guidelines 35% of mothers, 63% of fathers, 16% of girls and 23% of boys were overweight or obese. According to ATP III panel [1] definition for clinical identification of MetS 36% and 7% had an increased waist circumference, 7% and 24% increased blood pressure and 4% and 4% increased fasting glucose, respectively for mothers and fathers. Increased fasting glucose was found in 3% of the 8-year-old children. Median and interquartile range of adiponectin concentration in mg/l was 10.9[4.6], 8.2[4], 12.3[5.2], 11.4[4.1], 30.1[18.2] respectively for mothers, fathers, girls, boys at 8-year follow-up and newborn with significant higher values in female than in males (p(parents)<0.0001, p(8-year-old children)=0.003), but no gender difference in newborn (p=0.21). Whereas we found in adults significant negative correlations between adiponectin and BMI (mothers:r=-0.22, fathers:r=-0.35) or waist circumference (mothers:r=-0.23, fathers:r=-0.31), no significant correlations between adiponectin and body composition were found in 8-year-old children, and between adiponectin in cord blood and BMI in later life. However significant positive correlations were observed between adiponectin in cord blood and birth weight (r=0.14) or gestational age (r=0.12), and the children’s and maternal (r=0.36) or paternal (r=0.35) adiponectin concentration after correction for BMI of the parents. After correction for BMI neither in adults nor in children significant associations of adiponectin with waist circumference, blood pressure or fasting glucose were observed.

Conclusions: Whereas we confirmed the previously reported associations between adiponectin and markers of body composition in adults, we found no associations in their offspring besides weak correlations in newborn. Adiponectin in cord blood did not predict body composition in later life.


References

1.
Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults. Executive Summary of The Third Report of The National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, And Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol In Adults (Adult Treatment Panel III). JAMA. 2001;285(19):2486-97.