gms | German Medical Science

Kongress Medizin und Gesellschaft 2007

17. bis 21.09.2007, Augsburg

Time spent in traffic and outdoors as triggers of myocardial infarction?

Meeting Abstract

  • Annette Peters - GSF - Institut für Epidemiologie, Neuherberg
  • Stephanie von Klot - GSF - Institut für Epidemiologie, Neuherberg
  • Christa Meisinger - GSF - Institut für Epidemiologie, Neuherberg
  • Almut Hörmann - GSF - Institut für Gesundheitsökonomie und Management im Gesundheitswesen, Neuherberg
  • Hannelore Löwel - GSF - Institut für Epidemiologie, Neuherberg
  • H. Erich Wichmann - GSF - Institut für Epidemiologie, Neuherberg

Kongress Medizin und Gesellschaft 2007. Augsburg, 17.-21.09.2007. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2007. Doc07gmds303

Die elektronische Version dieses Artikels ist vollständig und ist verfügbar unter: http://www.egms.de/de/meetings/gmds2007/07gmds303.shtml

Veröffentlicht: 6. September 2007

© 2007 Peters et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielf&aauml;ltigt, verbreitet und &oauml;ffentlich zug&aauml;nglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

Text

Time spent in traffic was identified as triggering myocardial infarctions based on the KORA myocardial infarction registry. We present here an extended analysis doubling the time of data collection.

Patients surviving a myocardial infarction were interviewed after being transferred to the general wards within hospitals of the KORA study region. Interviews assessed activities during the four days preceding the onset of symptoms of the myocardial infarctions and included information on time spent in traffic and time spent outdoors. Conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate the effects of activities within the hours t=1 to 6 before symptom onset with control periods selected 24+t to 72 hours before symptom onset controlling for the hour of the day.

1466 myocardial infarction survivors age 25 to 74 were interviewed between 1999 and 2003. Being in traffic was associated with the onset of myocardial infarction one hour later (odds ratio (OR): 3.3, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.7 to 4.0, p<0.0001) for patients within the KORA region. Time spent outdoors was associated with an increased risk for the onset of myocardial infarction one hour later (OR: 3.1, 95% CI: 2.4 to 4.1, p<0.0001).

The extended analyses confirm the associations between time spent in traffic and the onset of myocardial infarction as reported earlier. In addition, time spent outdoors is a novel factor associated with triggering of myocardial infarctions which may warrant further attention.