gms | German Medical Science

Jahrestagung der Gesellschaft für Medizinische Ausbildung (GMA)

27.09. - 29.09.2012, Aachen

Monitoring the retrieval of knowledge – medical students change their strategies when taught pattern recognition

Poster

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  • corresponding author Ralph Nawrotzki - Universität Heidelberg, Institut für Anatomie und Zellbiologie, Heidelberg, Deutschland
  • Falk Herrmann - Universität Heidelberg, Institut für Anatomie und Zellbiologie, Heidelberg, Deutschland
  • Katja Götz - Universität Heidelberg, Institut für Anatomie und Zellbiologie, Heidelberg, Deutschland
  • Joachim Kirsch - Universität Heidelberg, Institut für Anatomie und Zellbiologie, Heidelberg, Deutschland

Jahrestagung der Gesellschaft für Medizinische Ausbildung (GMA). Aachen, 27.-29.09.2012. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2012. DocP110

doi: 10.3205/12gma014, urn:nbn:de:0183-12gma0148

Veröffentlicht: 18. September 2012

© 2012 Nawrotzki et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielf&aauml;ltigt, verbreitet und &oauml;ffentlich zug&aauml;nglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

Text

Here, we determined the strategies that students use to retrieve knowledge before and after completing a highly structured ultrasound course. Three groups (A: before; B: after the intervention; C: peer tutors) of ten participants each were asked to answer twelve MC questions on the anatomy of the abdomen by thinking aloud. Answers were recorded, transcribed and analyzed by protocol analyses. Concept maps were generated to visualize answering strategies (on average there were five maps for each question). Intercoder reliability (two experts) was high (P=0.89). Students in groups B and C favored non-analytical answering strategies (instant statements of patterns that they had recognized) while group A members produced analytical, long-worded answers. The average number of words per answer and the handling times decreased from A to C (A: 122, B: 84, C: 55 words and A: 68 to B: 31 and C: 14 seconds, respectively). This study revealed a profound change in the strategies that medical students use to retrieve knowledge once they completed a highly structured ultrasound course. Our data indicate that one can monitor students’ abilities to recognize patterns and that such gain of expertise should be analyzed in more detail in other interventional settings [1], [2], [3], [4], [5].


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