gms | German Medical Science

Jahrestagung der Gesellschaft für Medizinische Ausbildung (GMA)

02.10. - 05.10.2008, Greifswald

Development of expertise in clinical teaching (DECT) – a multidimensional study design

Poster

  • corresponding author Jan Breckwoldt - Charité – Campus Benjamin Franklin, Klinik für Anästhesiologie und operative Intensivmedizin, Berlin, Deutschland
  • Teresa Campbell - Charité – Campus Benjamin Franklin, Klinik für Anästhesiologie und operative Intensivmedizin, Berlin, Deutschland
  • Ulrike Fehr - Charité – Campus Benjamin Franklin, Klinik für Anästhesiologie und operative Intensivmedizin, Berlin, Deutschland
  • Kerstin Lingemann - Charité – Campus Benjamin Franklin, Klinik für Anästhesiologie und operative Intensivmedizin, Berlin, Deutschland
  • Christian Siggemann - Charité – Campus Benjamin Franklin, Klinik für Anästhesiologie und operative Intensivmedizin, Berlin, Deutschland

Jahrestagung der Gesellschaft für Medizinische Ausbildung - GMA. Greifswald, 02.-05.10.2008. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2008. Doc08gma95

Die elektronische Version dieses Artikels ist vollständig und ist verfügbar unter: http://www.egms.de/de/meetings/gma2008/08gma095.shtml

Eingereicht: 15. Juni 2008
Überarbeitet: 6. August 2008
Angenommen: 6. August 2008
Veröffentlicht: 19. August 2008

© 2008 Breckwoldt et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielf&aauml;ltigt, verbreitet und &oauml;ffentlich zug&aauml;nglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

Text

Objectives: There is uncertainty about what makes up the quality of clinical teaching and how expertise in clinical teaching might develop [1]. There is great need for qualitative research in this field to be able to generate more theory driven models for the improvement of didactical training. We therefore wanted to examine the development of expertise in clinical teaching by a multidimensional observational design. As quality criteria we used 10 categories of good teaching quality for which a sound evidence base is acknowledged in school teaching [2], [3].

Methods: Clinical teaching sessions of 50 minutes with a group of 5-6 3rd year students in emergency medicine were analysed using the following dimensions:

1.
structured analysis of the video recording by external experts
2.
evaluation by participating students using a questionnaire
3.
self-evaluation by the clinical teacher immediately after the session
4.
“think-aloud” protocol by the teacher reflecting about the video recording

In the dimensions (1) – (4) the 10 categories of good teaching from above formed the basis of investigation.

Results: 17 teaching sessions were analysed by the described design.

Teachers’ and students’ feedback was good, stating no major interference of the setting with their teaching encounter.

Conclusion: The method is feasible and seems to generate sufficient data on teaching quality. It is possible to correlate different perspectives on the teaching session with each other. Whether our method is useful to describe the development of expertise in clinical teaching remains to be investigated by larger cross-sectional samples.


References

1.
Steinert Y, Mann K, Centeno A, Dolmans D, Spencer J, Gelula M, Prodeaus D. A systematic review of faculty development initiatives designed to improve teaching effectiveness in medical education: BEME guide No. 8. Med Teach. 2006;28(6):497-526.
2.
Helmke A. Unterrichtsqualität erfassen, bewerten, verbessern. Seelze-Velber: Kallmeyer; 2003.
3.
Meyer H. Was ist guter Unterricht? Berlin: Cornelsen; 2004.