gms | German Medical Science

G-I-N Conference 2012

Guidelines International Network

22.08 - 25.08.2012, Berlin

How many guidelines use GRADE system in National Guideline Clearinghouse

Meeting Abstract

  • Y. Chen - Evidence Based Medicine Center of Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China; Chinese GRADE Center, Lanzhou, China
  • H. Xu - Evidence Based Medicine Center of Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China
  • Q. Wang - Evidence Based Medicine Center of Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China
  • X. Li - Evidence Based Medicine Center of Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China
  • L. Yao - The First Affiliated Hospital of Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China
  • H. Luo - Evidence Based Medicine Center of Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China
  • Y. Chen - Evidence Based Medicine Center of Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China
  • H. Xu - Evidence Based Medicine Center of Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China
  • M. Wang - The First Affiliated Hospital of Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China
  • K. Yang - Evidence Based Medicine Center of Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China; Chinese GRADE Center, Lanzhou, China

Guidelines International Network. G-I-N Conference 2012. Berlin, 22.-25.08.2012. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2012. DocP058

DOI: 10.3205/12gin170, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-12gin1700

Veröffentlicht: 10. Juli 2012

© 2012 Chen et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielfältigt, verbreitet und öffentlich zugänglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

Text

Background: The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system is considered to be a common, sensible and transparent approach to grading quality of evidence and strength of recommendations. Many guideline developers claimed that they have adopted GRADE system in their guidelines.

Objective: To investigate how many guidelines use GRADE system in National guideline clearing house (NGC).

Methods: We included all 2200 clinical practice guidelines listed in Disease/Condition in National guideline clearing house (http: //www.guidelines.gov/browse/by-topic.aspx), and each guideline was independently screened by 2 investigators.

Results: Eventually we identified 127 guidelines used GRADE system, accounted for 5.8% of all 2200, The published year were 2006 (1), 2007(28), 2008 (36), 2009 (19), 2010 (29), and 2011 (14) respectively. These guidelines were developed by 29 different institutions. The top five developers were American College of Physicians (24), Finnish Medical Society (23), Endocrine Society (19), American College of Chest Physicians (14), and NICE (9). In terms of the countries, 81 (60%) guidelines were developed in America, 22 in Finland, 11 in UK, 6 in Canada, and 7 produced by WHO. 59 (46%) guidelines adapted GRADE method in varying degrees and 68 (54%) used it without any modification.

Conclusion: A systematic approach to grading the strength of recommendations can minimize bias and aid interpretation of expert-created medical guidelines. Some well known and important organizations have begun to use GRADE method in their guidelines. However, GRADE is still a relatively new system and urgent needs to be disseminated and applied in the world.