gms | German Medical Science

13. Jahrestagung der Gesellschaft für Arzneimittelforschung und Arzneimittelepidemiologie

Gesellschaft für Arzneimittelforschung und Arzneimittelepidemiologie

02.11. bis 03.11.2006, Berlin

Detection of drug-related problems in community pharmacies in every day routine

Meeting Abstract

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  • corresponding author U. Birnbaum - Institute of Clinical Pharmacology (Campus Charité Mitte), Charité-University Medicine, Berlin, Germany
  • E. Räuscher - Institute of Clinical Pharmacology (Campus Charité Mitte), Charité-University Medicine, Berlin, Germany
  • M. Schaefer - Institute of Clinical Pharmacology (Campus Charité Mitte), Charité-University Medicine, Berlin, Germany

Gesellschaft für Arzneimittelanwendungsforschung und Arzneimittelepidemiologie e.V. (GAA). 13. Jahrestagung der Gesellschaft für Arzneimittelforschung und Arzneimittelepidemiologie. Berlin, 02.-03.11.2006. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2006. Doc06gaa17

Die elektronische Version dieses Artikels ist vollständig und ist verfügbar unter: http://www.egms.de/de/meetings/gaa2006/06gaa17.shtml

Veröffentlicht: 30. Oktober 2006

© 2006 Birnbaum et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielf&aauml;ltigt, verbreitet und &oauml;ffentlich zug&aauml;nglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

Text

Context: This study analysed detected, solved and documented drug-related problems (DRP) in the daily routine of different German community pharmacies by using PI-Doc®, a hierarchical system for problem-intervention documentation. PI-Doc® was developed with an emphasis on the user-friendliness in community pharmacy practice and has been used in several German pharmaceutical care studies as well as in hospitals.

Aims: To demonstrate that pharmacists are willing and able to detect, solve and document DRPs in every day routine and to categorise and analyse the different types of DRPs detected in order to better focus training modules for pharmacists to improve their abilities to detect more “hidden” problems.

Methods: Patients’ drug-related problems and their interventions were classified by using PI-Doc®. In addition, each drug was categorised using the ATC-Code (Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Code). Thus, active substances’ profiles were obtained which can be used for pharmaceutical consultations.

Results: Between September 2003 and June 2005, a total of 1147 DRPs were detected and documented in different German community pharmacies. Most DRPs were related to inappropriate drug choice (43.0%) and drug-drug interaction (30.0%). 31.9% of DRPs concerned the cardiovascular system. A total of 349 different active substances / product groups were detected (top 3: diclofenac, insulin and metoprolol). For insulin, 61 DRPs were found in 12 several problem categories. 26.2% of DRPs were related to drug-drug interactions.

Conclusion: The community pharmacy is an important interface in the health care system with regard to patient and medication safety. Data show that pharmacists are able to detect drug-related problems in daily routine. However, strategies to improve DRP detection should be further developed and data collection instruments should be refined to facilitate documentation. There is a need for more research on the economic implications of community pharmacy interventions.