gms | German Medical Science

13. Jahrestagung der Gesellschaft für Arzneimittelforschung und Arzneimittelepidemiologie

Gesellschaft für Arzneimittelforschung und Arzneimittelepidemiologie

02.11. bis 03.11.2006, Berlin

Analysing medication errors in general practice

Meeting Abstract

Suche in Medline nach

  • corresponding author K. Saal - Institut für Allgemeinmedizin, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität Frankfurt
  • E. Blauth - Institut für Allgemeinmedizin, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität Frankfurt
  • M. Beyer - Institut für Allgemeinmedizin, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität Frankfurt
  • F.M. Gerlach - Institut für Allgemeinmedizin, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität Frankfurt

Gesellschaft für Arzneimittelanwendungsforschung und Arzneimittelepidemiologie e.V. (GAA). 13. Jahrestagung der Gesellschaft für Arzneimittelforschung und Arzneimittelepidemiologie. Berlin, 02.-03.11.2006. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2006. Doc06gaa03

Die elektronische Version dieses Artikels ist vollständig und ist verfügbar unter: http://www.egms.de/de/meetings/gaa2006/06gaa03.shtml

Veröffentlicht: 30. Oktober 2006

© 2006 Saal et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielf&aauml;ltigt, verbreitet und &oauml;ffentlich zug&aauml;nglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

Text

Context: Medication errors account for 11-35% of errors in primary care. This estimate basically derives from the retrospective analysis of routine data. Little is known about the types of errors or their underlying causes in general practice.

Aim of the Study: To get to know more about types and possible causes of errors by systematically analysing the medical treatment for antihypertensive therapy and oral anticoagulation in general practice.

Material and Methods: For a fixed period of 12 months, data were collected and analyzed by chart audit. Additionally, every patient was interviewed by telephone. A list of criteria deriving from evidence-based guidelines as well as pharmacological databases for the review of drug interactions and contraindications were used and consensus with a clinical pharmacologist reached. Findings were discussed with the general practitioner and afterwards categorized as intended deviations, which were reasonable, rule- or knowledge-based mistakes, or violations, and unintended deviations, classified as slips or lapses.

Results: Seventeen general practices with 252 patients participated in the study. 10.6% of medication errors were lapses such as the lack of laboratory monitoring of medications. 13.4% slips occurred like the documentation of a wrong diagnosis which may lead to wrong treatment or assessment. Most errors, 38.5% were due to rule-based mistakes – the general practitioner attempting to monitor the kidney function by checking the serume creatinine level instead of calculating the kidney function. Violations such as the intramuscular application of NSAIR were found in 6.3%. Knowledge-based mistakes were rarely found (3.9%).

Conclusions: By tracking causes of errors or error prone activities it will be possible to develop instruments to reduce the number of lapses and slips in primary care. Such aids will fit into software programmes used in primary care. These instruments should be evaluated further.