gms | German Medical Science

7th EFSMA – European Congress of Sports Medicine, 3rd Central European Congress of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Annual Assembly of the German and the Austrian Society of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

Austrian Society of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

26.-29.10.2011, Salzburg, Österreich

Maximal oxygen consumption among 14–19-year-old cross-country skiers: a longitudinal study

Meeting Abstract

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  • author presenting/speaker Agnes Mägi - Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation Clinic, Tartu University Hospital, Tartu, Estonia
  • author Elis Lilo - Institute of Exercise Biology and Physiotherapy, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia
  • corresponding author Eve Unt - Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation Clinic, Tartu University Hospital, Tartu, Estonia; Institute of Exercise Biology and Physiotherapy, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia

7th EFSMA – European Congress of Sports Medicine, 3rd Central European Congress of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Salzburg, 26.-29.10.2011. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2011. Doc11esm222

DOI: 10.3205/11esm222, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-11esm2222

Veröffentlicht: 24. Oktober 2011

© 2011 Mägi et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielfältigt, verbreitet und öffentlich zugänglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

Text

Objective: It is known that aerobic capability in male cross-country skiers is very high. The maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) level among men may increase up to 89–93 ml/min/kg [1]. Longitudinal studies have shown that as an outcome of training [2]. VO2max increases the most in the age group 15–25. However, it is not clear to what extent this increase is related to training or other development values. The aim of this study was to analyze the maximal oxygen consumption longitudinally among 14–19-year-old cross-country skiers and its relation to anthropometric and cardiopulmonary values and with training characteristics.

Material/Methods: The subjects of this study were 34 cross-country skiers (14–19 years old, 23 males and 11 females), who have attended a periodic health evaluation (PHE) in the Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation Clinic of Tartu University Hospital, Estonia in 1997 to 2010. Inclusion criteria of the subjects were high level participation of cross-country skiing and periodic health evaluation once per year during the period in the age of 14 to 19 years. Subjects’ anthropometric data (body height, body mass, BMI), lung function values (spirography) and training characteristics were collected. Subjects’ VO2max was measured using gas analyzer system (Oxycon Pro 5., Hoechberg, Germany) according to standardized test on treadmill for cross-country skiers.

Results: During this age period (14 to 19 years), VO2max increased (61.1±4.8 to 67.7±4.8 ml/min/kg) in male subjects. In female subjects, mean VO2max values increased until the age of 17 yrs (54.4±4.7 and 57.2±3.9 ml/min/kg, in 14 yrs and 17 yrs old subjects, respectively), whereas after age of 18 it showed a tendency of decrease. In male subjects, statistically significant differences were found in 17, 18 and 19 yrs old subjects in comparison with 14 yrs old subjects (p≤0.05). During this age period, the highest VO2max increase was 12.3 ml/min/kg in males and 7.4 ml/min/kg in females. VO2max showed statistically significant associations with training volume, physical performance capacity, vital capacity of the lungs, and maximal ventilation (l/mn) of the lungs during the exercise test. Relationships were more expressed in male subjects than in female subjects. Anthropometric data did not reveal any statistically significant associations with VO2max.

Conclusion: Our study results show that VO2max is significantly associated with training volume, physical performance capacity and lung function and these relationships are more expressed in male subjects than in female subjects.


References

1.
Rusko H. Cross Country Skiing. Handbook of Sports Medicine and Science. Massachusetts: Blackwell Science; 2003.
2.
Baxter-Jones ADG, Sherar LB. Growth and maturation. In: Armstrong N, Ed. Advances in Sport and Exercise Science Series Paediatric Exercise Physiology. Elsevier limited; 2007. pp. 1-26.