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7th EFSMA – European Congress of Sports Medicine, 3rd Central European Congress of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Annual Assembly of the German and the Austrian Society of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

Austrian Society of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

26.-29.10.2011, Salzburg, Österreich

Proprioceptive training vs classical physiotherapy in children with Down Syndrome

Meeting Abstract

  • author presenting/speaker Bogdan Almajan-Guta - Department of Physical Education and Sport, Politehnica University, Timisoara, Timisoara, Romania
  • author Violeta Almajan-Guta - C.R.A.E Speranta, Timisoara, Timisoara, Romania
  • author Claudiu Avram - Department of Physical Education and Sport, West University of Timisoara, Timisoara, Romania
  • corresponding author Alexandra Mihaela Rusu - Victor Babes University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Timisoara, Romania
  • author Ornela Olivia Cluci - Victor Babes University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Timisoara, Romania
  • author Sebastian Gheltofan - Department of Physical Education and Sport, Politehnica University, Timisoara, Timisoara, Romania
  • author Hannelore Filipescu - Department of Physical Education and Sport, Politehnica University, Timisoara, Timisoara, Romania

7th EFSMA – European Congress of Sports Medicine, 3rd Central European Congress of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Salzburg, 26.-29.10.2011. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2011. Doc11esm134

DOI: 10.3205/11esm134, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-11esm1347

Veröffentlicht: 24. Oktober 2011

© 2011 Almajan-Guta et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielfältigt, verbreitet und öffentlich zugänglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

Text

Objective: To demonstrate the early interervention through proprioceptive training program performed in all the motor development stages, we’ll enhance the quality of motor behavior, we’ll achieve a faster acquisition of the main milestones and we’ll improve the postural tonus, the balance and transfers.

Material/Methods: The study was performed at Speranta Special Care Center Timisoara, during april 2008-april 2011. Lot study consisted in 30 randomized patients aged between 2 months-5 years with the mean age 2 years and 3 months. The subjects were divided in two groups: control group 15 subjects, classical kinetotherapeutic program 3 times/week/45 minutes; study group 15 subjects, proprioceptive training 3 times/week/45 minutes. The children were assesed before and after intervention using Bayley Motor Scales of Infant Development and we evalauted 12 milestones.

Results: Following the proprioceptive training all the subjects have presented an improvement in the development milestones compare to control group. Significant results have been obtain for: standing, walking, climbing stairs, running and jumping (p<0,05). At the end of the experiment, motor performance was: control group 1 subject normal performance -7%, 9 subjects late performance -60%, 5 subjects significant late performance -33%; study group 2 subjects normal performance -13%, 10 subjects late performance -67%, 3 subjects significant late performance -20%.

Conclusion: All the children have improved their performances because of the development of them during the study and cause of the kinetotherapeutic intervention. Still, the proprioceptive training had determined a significant diminution of the mean age of occurence in the main milestones compare to classical intervention. The proprioceptive training must be included in the kinetotherapeutic management of each child with Down syndrome. The early intervention is desired for the achievement of maximum potential of the child.

Funding aknowledgement: The production of this study was financially supported with the help of the study grant CNCSIS RO, TE/cod 36.


References

1.
Sacks B, Buckley S. Motor Development for Individuals with Down Syndrome: An Overview. Portsmouth, United Kingdom.
2.
Ulrich DA, Ulrich BD, Angulo-Kinzler RM, Yun J. Treadmill training of infants with Down syndrome: evidence-based developmental outcomes. Pediatrics. 2001;108:84–91. (Down Syndrome Educational Trust; 2003.)
3.
Piper MC, Gosselin C, Gendron M, Mazer B. Developmental profile of Down’s syndrome infants receiving early intervention. Child Care Health Dev. 1986.