gms | German Medical Science

104. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Ophthalmologischen Gesellschaft e. V. (DOG)

21. - 24.09.2006, Berlin

Visual evoked potentials in patients with brain circulatory problems

Meeting Abstract

  • D. Pojda-Wilczek - Department of Ophthalmology and Eye Clinic Division Medical University of Silesia, Specialistic Hospital nr 1 in Bytom, Poland
  • E. Herba - Department of Ophthalmology and Eye Clinic Division Medical University of Silesia, Specialistic Hospital nr 1 in Bytom, Poland
  • K. Makowiecka - Department of Ophthalmology and Eye Clinic Division Medical University of Silesia, Specialistic Hospital nr 1 in Bytom, Poland
  • B. Zatorska - Department of Ophthalmology and Eye Clinic Division Medical University of Silesia, Specialistic Hospital nr 1 in Bytom, Poland
  • W. Jędrzejewski - Department of Ophthalmology and Eye Clinic Division Medical University of Silesia, Specialistic Hospital nr 1 in Bytom, Poland
  • S. M. Pojda - Department of Ophthalmology and Eye Clinic Division Medical University of Silesia, Specialistic Hospital nr 1 in Bytom, Poland

Deutsche Ophthalmologische Gesellschaft e.V.. 104. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Ophthalmologischen Gesellschaft (DOG). Berlin, 21.-24.09.2006. Düsseldorf, Köln: German Medical Science; 2006. Doc06dogDO.11.09

Die elektronische Version dieses Artikels ist vollständig und ist verfügbar unter: http://www.egms.de/de/meetings/dog2006/06dog089.shtml

Veröffentlicht: 18. September 2006

© 2006 Pojda-Wilczek et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielf&aauml;ltigt, verbreitet und &oauml;ffentlich zug&aauml;nglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

Text

Objective

The aim of this study was to find out if local brain circulatory problems may influence visual evoked potentials (VEP).

Methods

38 patients (70 eyes) were divided into 3 groups: I- with hemiparesis after brain stroke, II- with hemianopsia or quadrantanopsia after brain stroke, III- with amaurosis fugax. The control group consisted of 38 patients (75 eyes) with initial aged-related macular degeneration (AMD). Corrected visual acuity was full in all examined eyes (5/5). VEP were examined using LKC equipment, program UTAS E-2000, pattern (PVEP) and flash (FVEP) stimulations in accordance with ISCEV standards but with the use of two electrodes placed at O1 and O2. Latency and amplitude of positive waves P100 and P2 were calculated. For the statistical analysis Neuman-Keuls test was used.

Results

In PVEP no differences between groups of P100 amplitude and latency were found. In FVEP mean P2 latency was significantly longer in group I than in group III and P2 amplitude was significantly lower in all examined groups in comparison with the control group. PVEP revealed differences over 3 ms in P100 latency between brain hemispheres in 60% of patients in group I, 50% in group II, 66% in group III and differences in P100 amplitude over 30% occurred in 70%, 70%, 55%, respectively. FVEP latency differences between brain hemispheres over 3 ms were found in 58% patients in group I, 72% in group II, 78% in group III and differences in amplitude over 30% occurred in 83%, 64%, 33%, respectively. In patients with AMD no differences occurred between brain hemispheres in latency and only a small difference in amplitude (5% of patients in PVEP and 1% in FVEP).

Conclusions

Local brain circulatory problems cause differences of VEP amplitude and latency between brain hemispheres. Similar hemisphere differences of VEP observed in patients with amaurosis fugax may confirm a vasogenic background of this symptom.