gms | German Medical Science

27. Deutscher Krebskongress

Deutsche Krebsgesellschaft e. V.

22. - 26.03.2006, Berlin

Information request and patient satisfaction in radiation therapy

Meeting Abstract

  • corresponding author presenting/speaker Hans Geinitz - Klinik für Strahlentherapie der Technischen Universität München, Deutschland
  • Susanne Sehlen - Klinik für Strahlentherapie der Ludwig-Maximillias-Universität München
  • Celia Pirker - Klinik für Psychosomatische Medizin der Technischen Universität München
  • Petra Berg - Klinik für Psychosomatische Medizin der Technischen Universität München
  • Gerhard Henrich - Klinik für Psychosomatische Medizin der Technischen Universität München
  • Eckhart Dühmke - Klinik für Strahlentherapie der Ludwig-Maximillias-Universität München
  • Michael Molls - Klinik für Strahlentherapie der Technischen Universität München
  • Peter Herschbach - Klinik für Psychosomatische Medizin der Technischen Universität München
  • Susanne Sehlen - Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie der Ludwig-Maximillians-Universitaet München

27. Deutscher Krebskongress. Berlin, 22.-26.03.2006. Düsseldorf, Köln: German Medical Science; 2006. DocPO547

Die elektronische Version dieses Artikels ist vollständig und ist verfügbar unter: http://www.egms.de/de/meetings/dkk2006/06dkk657.shtml

Veröffentlicht: 20. März 2006

© 2006 Geinitz et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielf&aauml;ltigt, verbreitet und &oauml;ffentlich zug&aauml;nglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

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Purpose: To evaluate the patient’s request for additional information on radiation therapy (RT) and its correlation to patient satisfaction.

Material and Methods: 247 consecutive patients undergoing RT in two university hospitals were interviewed after their second week of therapy. All patients had received information on RT during a dialogue with a physician about 4-6 weeks before the start of therapy and on the first day of treatment. The patient’s request on further information concerning RT was retrospectively evaluated with a standardized questionnaire. Patient satisfaction concerning health care was evaluated with two validated instruments (“FPZ”, Henrich et al. 2001 and “ZUF-8”, Schmidt et al. 1989).

Results: 39% of the patients would have liked more information on RT before the start of therapy. The following subjects were requested: “information on the effect of radiation” (32% of the total patient population), “how does a linear accelerator work” (30%), “what are rays” (27%), “information on possible side effects” (20%), “details on different steps in the course of radiation therapy” (19%), and “appearance of the treatment room” (19%). The following means of information were wanted: brochures (36%), lectures by physicians (30%), videos (23%), lectures on supportive measures (21%), lectures by patients (16%), and computer-aided information/internet access in the hospital (13%). Requirement for information did not correlate with care taking institution, patient age or sex, marital status, education, disease entity or diseases status. Patients who wanted further information on RT had a lower global ZUF-8-score (p=0.024) but there was no difference in the global FPZ score. Information-requiring patients more often suggested improvement in “physician empathy” (p=0.008) and “additional physician-patient contact” (p=0.020).

Conclusions: There was a substantial subset of patients through all ages and disease entities/stages that required additional information on RT before the start of therapy. This group of patient seems to be a little less satisfied with treatment and health care in general than patients who did not request information. Brochures, physician lectures or videos could be patient-accepted measures to compensate these information deficits for individual population subsets.