gms | German Medical Science

27. Deutscher Krebskongress

Deutsche Krebsgesellschaft e. V.

22. - 26.03.2006, Berlin

Long-Term Survival with Metastatic Breast Cancer: First Results of a Retrospective Analysis of Patients Treated at the West German Cancer Center (University of Essen Medical School)

Meeting Abstract

  • corresponding author presenting/speaker Siegfried Seeber - West German Cancer Center, University of Essen, Medical School, Deutschland
  • Christian Pohlkamp - West German Cancer Center, University of Essen, Medical School
  • Anja Welt - West German Cancer Center, University of Essen, Medical School
  • Cathrin Walter - West German Cancer Center, University of Essen, Medical School
  • Tanja Trarbach - West German Cancer Center, University of Essen, Medical School
  • Catrin Lehnerdt - West German Cancer Center, University of Essen, Medical School
  • Jörg Hense - West German Cancer Center, University of Essen, Medical School
  • Ulrich Hügle - West German Cancer Center, University of Essen, Medical School
  • Max Ernst Scheulen - West German Cancer Center, University of Essen, Medical School

27. Deutscher Krebskongress. Berlin, 22.-26.03.2006. Düsseldorf, Köln: German Medical Science; 2006. DocPO045

Die elektronische Version dieses Artikels ist vollständig und ist verfügbar unter: http://www.egms.de/de/meetings/dkk2006/06dkk155.shtml

Veröffentlicht: 20. März 2006

© 2006 Seeber et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielf&aauml;ltigt, verbreitet und &oauml;ffentlich zug&aauml;nglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

Text

Background: In the majority of controlled clinical studies, for patients (pts) with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) a median overall survival (mOS) between 12 and 24 months is reported. Regarding to the armamentarium of cytotoxic drugs, hormonal treatment options and target-specific antibodies available meanwhile to effectively treat MBC, this mOS is surprisingly short. A possible explanation is suboptimal sequential treatment. However, publications demonstrating evidence for the efficacy of therapy in 4th and subsequent lines are rare.

Methods: We regularly administered 4th and subsequent line therapies in pts with good performance status according to an individualized sequential treatment plan including close monitoring of response and toxicity. Course of disease was retrospectively analyzed with emphasis on mOS and 5-year survival rate (5YSR) during 5-year intervals (1985-89, 1990-94, etc.). Here, we report the data of 196 unselected pts presenting to our clinic with MBC from 1995 to 1999. Particular attention was paid to high-risk pts with hormone receptor-negative (HR-) disease and/or visceral metastases. Further, we analyzed number and duration of therapeutic regimens administered to pts with a defined long-term mOS of 48 months or more.

Results: For all pts mOS was 36 months and 5YSR 26%. Even for pts with HR- disease, reflecting poor prognosis and less treatment options, mOS was 24 months and 5YSR was 17%. In 71 pts initially presenting with hepatic metastases we observed a mOS of 26 months and a 5YSR of 17%. Single pts with initially advanced hepatic or lung metastases survived 8 to 10 years. The average number of therapeutic regimens administered to pts with long-term mOS of 48 months or more was 11 with a mean duration of 3 months until progression, inacceptable toxicity or shift to maintenance therapy.

Conclusion: Although our retrospective monocentric analysis is preliminary, our data indicate that, in contrast to clinical studies, improved mOS may be achieved by optimal sequential treatment individually adjusted by experienced oncologists.