gms | German Medical Science

62. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie (DGNC)
Joint Meeting mit der Polnischen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgen (PNCH)

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie (DGNC) e. V.

07. - 11. Mai 2011, Hamburg

Normal neural multipotent progenitor cells and their influence on glioblastomas

Meeting Abstract

  • H.S. Günther - Department of Neurosurgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany
  • T. Schuler - Department of Neurosurgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany
  • N.O. Schmidt - Department of Neurosurgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany
  • M. Westphal - Department of Neurosurgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany
  • K. Lamszus - Department of Neurosurgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie. Polnische Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgen. 62. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie (DGNC), Joint Meeting mit der Polnischen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgen (PNCH). Hamburg, 07.-11.05.2011. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2011. DocMO.07.04

DOI: 10.3205/11dgnc041, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-11dgnc0410

Veröffentlicht: 28. April 2011

© 2011 Günther et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielfältigt, verbreitet und öffentlich zugänglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

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Objective: In the adult brain, neural multipotent progenitor cells are thought to be involved in the repair of injured brain areas. In the context of brain tumors, it was shown that neural progenitor cells can migrate towards the tumor and infiltrate the tumor mass, and thus represent an attractive vehicle for gene therapy approaches. However, the interaction between neural multipotent progenitor cells and glioma cells is poorly understood. We therefore investigated whether neural progenitor cells are able to influence the growth and motility of glioma cells.

Methods: Human adult neural progenitor cells (HANSE cells) were isolated from temporal lobe tissue resected from patients with intractable epilepsy and cultured using serum-free neural stem cell conditions. We used conditioned HANSE cell supernatants to assess the effects of HANSE cell-released factors on growth, migration and apoptosis of human glioma cell lines, which was tested using proliferation, chemotaxis and Annexin V apoptosis assays, respectively. Cell lines included a panel of conventional, adherent glioma cell lines as well as human glioblastoma stem cell lines (GS lines).

Results: Conditioned medium from adult neural progenitor cells significantly inhibited the proliferation of different human glioblastoma cell lines. For example, proliferation of cell line G112 was inhibited by 43%, and proliferation of U251 cells was inhibited by 30%. The HANSE cell medium did not affect the rate of apoptosis in glioma cell cultures, suggesting that the anti-growth effect is not explained by secreted pro-apoptotic factors contained in the medium. In addition, the conditioned medium had no effect on the motility of gliomas cells in modified Boyden chamber migration assays.

Conclusions: Our study demonstrates that neural multipotent progenitor cells from the human adult brain secrete factors that inhibit the growth of human glioma cells. These findings suggest that HANSE cells have intrinsic anti-tumor activity, which is not mediated by anti-apoptotic factors.