gms | German Medical Science

61. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie (DGNC) im Rahmen der Neurowoche 2010
Joint Meeting mit der Brasilianischen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie am 20. September 2010

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie (DGNC) e. V.

21. - 25.09.2010, Mannheim

Does virtual reality help in constructing a more accurate mental representation than magnetic resonance images? A prospective study

Meeting Abstract

  • Axel Thomas Stadie - Neurochirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik der Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Mainz, Deutschland
  • Ines Degenhardt - Abteilung Allgemeine Experimentelle Psychologie, Psychologisches Institut der Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Mainz, Deutschland
  • Gerardo Conesa - Servicio de Neurocirugía, Hospital del Mar, Barcelona, Spanien
  • Robert Reisch - Zentrum für endoskopische und minimal invasive Neurochirurgie, Hirslanden Klinik, Zürich, Schweiz
  • Ralf Alfons Kockro - Neurochirurgische Klinik Universitätsspital Zürich, Schweiz
  • Gerrit Fischer - Neurochirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik der Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Mainz, Deutschland
  • Heiko Hecht - Abteilung Allgemeine Experimentelle Psychologie, Psychologisches Institut der Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Mainz, Deutschland

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie. 61. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie (DGNC) im Rahmen der Neurowoche 2010. Mannheim, 21.-25.09.2010. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2010. DocP1819

DOI: 10.3205/10dgnc290, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-10dgnc2909

Veröffentlicht: 16. September 2010

© 2010 Stadie et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielfältigt, verbreitet und öffentlich zugänglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

Text

Objective: Progress in medical imaging and refined methods of surgery planning such as Virtual Reality (VR), call for an investigation of the acquisition of three-dimensional anatomical knowledge as a crucial goal of medical education. This study compared the efficacy to reconstruct a three-dimensional arrangement of objects that was either presented as real model, as magnetic resonance images (MRI), or as VR model.

Methods: From April 2005 to June 2006 two groups, experienced neurosurgeons and medical students in their fourth year of medical education, studied a three-dimensional arrangement of water-filled plastic objects either as a real model, using a VR workstation, or by examining the MRI images. They were then asked to reconstruct the model as accurately as possible. The reconstructed models were then compared to the respective original models.

Results: The most accurate reconstructions were achieved when the participants had memorized the real model. VR visualization produced larger errors, and reconstruction accuracy based on MRI scans was worst. Neurosurgeons did not perform better than students.

Conclusions: Our results show that, compared to standard MRI scans, the accuracy of mental representation does benefit from the stereoscopic rendering of the model, which has been built from sequential MRI scans. However, best results were achieved when learning from the original model. Thus, VR is beneficial and at the same time there is room for further improvement when trying to optimize the visual basis for anatomy training and surgery planning, both for expert as well as for novice surgeons.