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61. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie (DGNC) im Rahmen der Neurowoche 2010
Joint Meeting mit der Brasilianischen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie am 20. September 2010

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie (DGNC) e. V.

21. - 25.09.2010, Mannheim

High frequency stimulation and pharmacological inactivation of the globus pallidus and the nucleus entopeduncularis differentially affect quinpirole-induced compulsive checking in rats

Meeting Abstract

  • Anaïs Djodari-Irani - Department of Neurosurgery, Technical University Dresden, Germany; Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Charité Campus Mitte, University Medicine Berlin, Germany
  • Julia Klein - Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Charité Campus Mitte, University Medicine Berlin, Germany
  • Johann Banzhaf - Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Charité Campus Mitte, University Medicine Berlin, Germany
  • Rudolf Morgenstern - Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Charité Campus Mitte, University Medicine Berlin, Germany
  • corresponding author Christine Winter - Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Technical University Dresden, Germany

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie. 61. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie (DGNC) im Rahmen der Neurowoche 2010. Mannheim, 21.-25.09.2010. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2010. DocV1670

DOI: 10.3205/10dgnc143, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-10dgnc1437

Veröffentlicht: 16. September 2010

© 2010 Djodari-Irani et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielfältigt, verbreitet und öffentlich zugänglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

Text

Objective: Deep brain stimulation (DBS) at high frequencies (HFS) is currently studied in the treatment of therapy-refractory obsessive compulsive disorders (OCD). The diversity of targeted brain areas used and the discrepancy in demonstrating beneficial effects, highlight the need for better mapping of brain regions in which stimulation may yield beneficial effects in OCD. Such goal may be advanced by the investigation of the effects of DBS in appropriate animal models of OCD.

Methods: The present study tested the effect of bilateral HFS and of bilateral pharmacological inactivation via the GABA-agonist muscimol of both, the Globus pallidus (GP; rodent equivalent to human GP externus) and the Nucleus entopeduncularis (EP; rodent equivalent to human GP internus) on checking behavior in the quinpirole rat model of OCD. Control (n=56) and quinpirole-treated rats (n=64) were bilaterally implanted with electrodes (n=76) or guide cannulae (n=44) in the GP (n=60) or the EP (n=60). HFS was performed at 130 Hz and current intensities of 75, 100 and 150 µA, respectively. Muscimol was administered intracerebrally at dosages of 0.0005, 0.001 and 0.005 µg per 0.5 µl per side.

Results: We demonstrate that at all current intensities tested HFS of the GP did not reduce and HFS of the EP only partially reduced OCD-like behaviour in the quinpirole rat model of OCD. In contrast, pharmacological inactivation of both, the GP and the EP, significantly reduces OCD-like behaviour in the quinpirole rat model of OCD at all dosages tested.

Conclusions: These data do not support previously derived data on the effectiveness of HFS of the subthalamic nucleus, nucleus accumbens, GP, and EP in the same and other rat models of OCD. We conclude that i) although GP and EP play an important role in the pathophysiology of OCD, these areas may not represent first choice target structures in the treatment of OCD via HFS, ii) the effectiveness of HFS may depend on different subtypes of OCD, represented in different animal models of OCD, iii) differential net mechanisms may subserve the effectiveness of HFS and pharmacological inactivation.