gms | German Medical Science

58. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie e. V. (DGNC)

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie (DGNC) e. V.

26. bis 29.04.2007, Leipzig

Migration of somatic stem cells from umbilical cord blood towards glioma cells

Migration somatischer Stammzellen aus Nabelschnurblut zu Gliomzellen

Meeting Abstract

  • corresponding author A. Trampe-Kieslich - Institut für Neuropathologie, Universitätsklinikum Düsseldorf
  • A. El-Khattouti - Institut für Transplantationsdiagnostik und Zelltherapeutika, Universitätsklinikum Düsseldorf
  • M. Rapp - Neurochirurgische Klinik, Universitätsklinikum Düsseldorf
  • G. Kögler - Institut für Transplantationsdiagnostik und Zelltherapeutika, Universitätsklinikum Düsseldorf
  • P. Wernet - Institut für Transplantationsdiagnostik und Zelltherapeutika, Universitätsklinikum Düsseldorf
  • T. Trapp - Institut für Transplantationsdiagnostik und Zelltherapeutika, Universitätsklinikum Düsseldorf
  • M. Sabel - Neurochirurgische Klinik, Universitätsklinikum Düsseldorf
  • G. Reifenberger - Institut für Neuropathologie, Universitätsklinikum Düsseldorf

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie. 58. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie e.V. (DGNC). Leipzig, 26.-29.04.2007. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2007. DocDO.02.02

Die elektronische Version dieses Artikels ist vollständig und ist verfügbar unter: http://www.egms.de/de/meetings/dgnc2007/07dgnc012.shtml

Veröffentlicht: 11. April 2007

© 2007 Trampe-Kieslich et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielf&aauml;ltigt, verbreitet und &oauml;ffentlich zug&aauml;nglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

Text

Objective: Glioblastomas are the most common and most malignant primary brain tumors. Despite intensive multimodal therapy, including operation, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, most glioblastoma patients can not be cured and have a poor prognosis as indicated by a mean survival of less than 12 months after diagnosis. Several groups have shown that somatic stem cells of different origins display a marked tropism for malignant gliomas and, therefore, might be useful vehicles to improve therapeutic gene delivery to brain tumors [1], [2], [3]. Based on these findings, we initiated a research project that aims at the investigation of the potential of a unique type of human somatic stem cells, namely umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells (so-called unrestricted somatic stem cells, USSCs), as a new source for stem cell-mediated gene therapy.

Methods: We investigated the migration of USSCs towards glioma cells in vitro using a transwell assay and an agarose invasion assay. Different antibodies to cytokines, cytokine receptors and enzymes were tested for their ability to block USSC migration. Furthermore we isolated mRNA from migrated and non migrated USSCs respectively, followed by expression analysis using RT-PCR. We also performed pilot in vivo experiments to evaluate the survival and detection of USSCs via anti-human nuclei immunofluorescence after transplantation into the brain of adult rats and intraveneous administration.

Results: Our data show that various rat and human glioma cell lines are able to specifically attract USSCs when tested both in a transwell assay and in an agarose invasion assay. CXCR-4 antibody and PI3 kinase inhibitors had no influence on USSC migration while the application of HGF antibody lead to a significant reduction of USSC migration. Furthermore migrated USSCs showed an increased expression of HGF receptor mRNA. In vivo, USSCs can be specifically detected using the anti-human nuclei antibody.

Conclusions: Expression analysis and antibody experiments revealed that HGF seems to play a critical role for USSC migration towards glioma cells in vitro.


References

1.
Aboody et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 2000;97(23):12846-51.
2.
Brown et al. Hum Gene Ther. 2003;14(18):1777-85.
3.
Tabatabai et al. Brain. 2005;128(Pt 9):2200-11.