gms | German Medical Science

56. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie e. V. (DGNC)
3èmes journées françaises de Neurochirurgie (SFNC)

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie e. V.
Société Française de Neurochirurgie

07. bis 11.05.2005, Strasbourg

Complex therapy of frontoethmoidal meningoencephaloceles under the conditions of a third world country : neurosurgical aspects ; getragen von Ärzte der Welt e.V.

Therapie der frontoethmoidalen Meningoencephalocele unter Bedingungen eines Entwicklungslandes aus neurochirurgischer Sicht: getragen von Ärzte der Welt e.V.

Meeting Abstract

Suche in Medline nach

  • corresponding author T. Pinzer - Klinik und Poliklinik für Neurochirurgie, Universitätsklinikum Dresden
  • G. Lauer - Klinik und Poliklinik für Mund-, Kiefer- und Gesichtschirurgie, Universitätsklinikum Dresden
  • J. Gollogly - ROSE Charities Surgical Rehabilitation Center Kien Khleang, Phnom Penh
  • G. Schackert - Klinik und Poliklinik für Neurochirurgie, Universitätsklinikum Dresden

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie. Société Française de Neurochirurgie. 56. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie e.V. (DGNC), 3èmes journées françaises de Neurochirurgie (SFNC). Strasbourg, 07.-11.05.2005. Düsseldorf, Köln: German Medical Science; 2005. DocP217

Die elektronische Version dieses Artikels ist vollständig und ist verfügbar unter: http://www.egms.de/de/meetings/dgnc2005/05dgnc0485.shtml

Veröffentlicht: 4. Mai 2005

© 2005 Pinzer et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielf&aauml;ltigt, verbreitet und &oauml;ffentlich zug&aauml;nglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

Text

Objective

Meningoceles and Meningoencephaloceles (MEC) are congenital malformations with a high incidence in Southeast Asia. The most frequent frontoethmoidal MEC need surgical treatment, applying cranio-facial techniques. To our knowledge this is the first report of operating a series of MEC not in an established craniofacial center, but under tropical conditions, with limited hygiene and limited technical medical support. The operative approach and the results are presented highlighting the neurosurgical aspects.

Methods

14 patients (6 female, 8 male, age 5-22 years) were operated on within two weeks in the ROSE Charities Surgical Rehabilitation Center Kien Khleang, Phnom, Penh, Cambodia. 8 patients suffered from combined nasoethmoidal-nasoorbital MEC. 6 patients had previous surgery through a nasal incision. 6 patients had associated malformations. Only plain x-ray films were available for radiographic imaging; no preoperative blood tests were taken. Furthermore, neither postoperative intensive care, nor blood for transfusion was available. This type of operation has not been performed in this hospital before. A modified surgical procedure was employed: frontobasal closure of the cele, the bone defect and corrective maneuvers of the orbital and nasal skeleton were successfully performed through a bicoronal approach.

Results

Satisfactory to good esthetic results of the frontal, orbital and nasal areas could be achieved in all patients. No meningitis, no CSF leakage (also not temporary) and no MEC relapse were observed in the follow-up of up to 9 months. One patient developed an inflammatory frontal fistula. Surgical revision revealed granulation tissue around the fixing dura sutures and around the osteosynthesis wires; but no CSF leakage. After revision, the fistula healed uneventfully.

Conclusions

The selected simple combined neurosurgical and cranio-maxillofacial operation technique - which had not yet been described - proved to be reliable even under the limited conditions of a third world hospital. The costs of these operations are by far below the costs of similar surgery in centers abroad, thus enabling the treatment of the very poor people in the third world.