gms | German Medical Science

56. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie e. V. (DGNC)
3èmes journées françaises de Neurochirurgie (SFNC)

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie e. V.
Société Française de Neurochirurgie

07. bis 11.05.2005, Strasbourg

A model of high cervical spinal cord contusion inducing a persistent unilateral respiratory deficit in the adult rat

Meeting Abstract

  • corresponding author B. Baussart - Laboratoire de Physiologie Neurovégétative, UMR CNRS INRA 6153 1147, Marseille, France
  • J. Polentes - Laboratoire de Physiologie Neurovégétative, UMR CNRS INRA 6153 1147, Marseille, France
  • J. C. Stamegna - Laboratoire de Physiologie Neurovégétative, UMR CNRS INRA 6153 1147, Marseille, France
  • S. Vinit - Laboratoire de Physiologie Neurovégétative, UMR CNRS INRA 6153 1147, Marseille, France
  • P. Gauthier - Laboratoire de Physiologie Neurovégétative, UMR CNRS INRA 6153 1147, Marseille, France
  • M. Tadié - Service de Neurochirurgie, CHU de Bicêtre, Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie. Société Française de Neurochirurgie. 56. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie e.V. (DGNC), 3èmes journées françaises de Neurochirurgie (SFNC). Strasbourg, 07.-11.05.2005. Düsseldorf, Köln: German Medical Science; 2005. DocP104

Die elektronische Version dieses Artikels ist vollständig und ist verfügbar unter: http://www.egms.de/de/meetings/dgnc2005/05dgnc0372.shtml

Veröffentlicht: 4. Mai 2005

© 2005 Baussart et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielf&aauml;ltigt, verbreitet und &oauml;ffentlich zug&aauml;nglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

Text

Objective

Respiratory insufficiency still contributes to increased mortality and morbidity following human spinal cord injury. Experimental high cervical complete or partial hemisections are currently available but a model of cervical contusion is lacking probably because of high mortality due to injury of the descending bulbospinal respiratory pathways commanding the phrenic motoneurons. The present work reports a new cervical spinal cord contusion model inducing a persistent ipsilateral diaphragmatic paralysis.

Methods

The cervical spinal cord of adult Sprague-Dawley rats was exposed and a spinal “1 mm3 - dorsal gap” was performed at the left C2 level. At this level a metallic impactor was used to compress unilaterally the spinal cord. A 20 g-weight was dropped from a 100 mm height along the impactor and the compression was maintained during 30 minutes.

Results

Electrophysiology showed a complete ipsilateral diaphragmatic paralysis and a silent corresponding phrenic activity. Such a respiratory deficit started just after the compression and was still persistent 7 days later. Morphology showed damaged ventro-lateral columns. The “dorsal gap” appeared necessary 1) to prevent mechanical absorption of the spinal shock by the dorsal columns, 2) to target the impact drop at the ventro-lateral white matter, which included the descending respiratory pathways.

Conclusions

Our model of C2 lateralized contusion leads to a persistent ipsilateral respiratory deficit. This model presents the interest to injure the descending cervical respiratory pathways by multiple lesions similar to those encountered in human traumatic pathology (streching, crushing, ischemic compression, demyelination). From this model of unilateral respiratory deficit, different experimental therapeutic strategies (local spinal cord hypothermia, glial cell transplantation, neuroprotrective substances…) will be tested to improve functional recovery after cervical spinal cord trauma.