gms | German Medical Science

56. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie e. V. (DGNC)
3èmes journées françaises de Neurochirurgie (SFNC)

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie e. V.
Société Française de Neurochirurgie

07. bis 11.05.2005, Strasbourg

Comparison of intermittent and continuous chronic deep brain stimulation of the Ncl. Subthalamicus (STN) on seizure activity in a rat model of absence epilepsy

Vergleich chronisch-intermittierender mit -kontinuierlicher Tiefenhirnstimulation des Ncl. Subthalamicus auf die Anfallsaktivität im Absencenepilepsie Modell der Ratte

Meeting Abstract

  • corresponding author B. Fritsch - Interdisziplinäres Epilepsiezentrum, Klinik für Neurologie, Philipps-Universität Marburg
  • H. Karakizlis - Interdisziplinäres Epilepsiezentrum, Klinik für Neurologie, Philipps-Universität Marburg
  • H. M. Hamer - Interdisziplinäres Epilepsiezentrum, Klinik für Neurologie, Philipps-Universität Marburg
  • A. Dempfle - Institut für medizinische Biometrie und Epidemiologie, Philipps-Universität Marburg
  • W. H. Oertel - Interdisziplinäres Epilepsiezentrum, Klinik für Neurologie, Philipps-Universität Marburg
  • F. Rosenow - Interdisziplinäres Epilepsiezentrum, Klinik für Neurologie, Philipps-Universität Marburg

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie. Société Française de Neurochirurgie. 56. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie e.V. (DGNC), 3èmes journées françaises de Neurochirurgie (SFNC). Strasbourg, 07.-11.05.2005. Düsseldorf, Köln: German Medical Science; 2005. DocP009

Die elektronische Version dieses Artikels ist vollständig und ist verfügbar unter: http://www.egms.de/de/meetings/dgnc2005/05dgnc0277.shtml

Veröffentlicht: 4. Mai 2005

© 2005 Fritsch et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielf&aauml;ltigt, verbreitet und &oauml;ffentlich zug&aauml;nglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

Text

Objective

Experimental data and case reports of patients suffering from epilepsy treated with STN stimulation (HFS) suggest an anticonvulsive effect. An anticonvulsive effect of acute high frequency stimulation (HFS) into an ongoing absence seizure has been reported in the generalised absence epileptic rat from Strasbourg (GAERS). In the present study the influence of two chronic stimulation paradigms on seizure activity in a rat model of absence epilepsy was investigated.

Methods

Bilateral chronic intermittent or continuous STN HFS was conducted to rats of the WAG/Rij strain (n=12/n=10), suffering from well- defined absence seizures. Bipolar, concentric deep brain electrodes and screw-skull electrodes were implanted by stereotaxy. A stimulation frequency of 130 Hz with an single-impulse duration of 60 µs, with current strength 20% below the motor threshold was given as train of 30 sec. every 5 min. for one hour in the intermittent stimulation group and continuously for 10 minutes in the continuous stimulation group. The procedure was repeated after one week (intermittent stimulation) or three days (continuous stimulation). Effects were evaluated by cumulated seizure duration (CSD) and seizure frequency (SF) in the EEG during a baseline period (B1 and B2 à 1h/10min) during stimulation (S1 and S2 1h/10min) and immediately after stimulation (P1 and P2 à 1h/10min). For statistical analysis, the non-parametric Friedman-Test followed by the Wilcoxon-Test was performed.

Results

After the first stimulation period, the chronic intermittent bilateral HFS of the STN resulted in a decrease of cumulated seizure duration (B1: 119 sec; S1: 61 sec.; P1: 38 sec.) and in a further reduction also during baseline measurement on the second experimental day one week later (B2: 20 sec; S2: 13 sec.; P2: 3 sec.). This reduction in CSD and SF was statistically significant (CSD: B1 vs B2 p=0,006, B1 vs. P1 p=0,008; SF: B1 vs B2 p=0,006, B1 vs. P1 p=0,013). The continuous stimulation design revealed no anticonvulsive effect.

Conclusions

This study provides evidence for the anticonvulsive properties of chronic intermittent bilateral HFS of the STN in absence epilepsy. Ineffectiveness of chronic-continuous stimulation suggest dependency of anticonvulsive effects on stimulation paradigms. In addition, a long-term anticonvulsive effect lasting at least for one week was assessed and was boosted by the second stimulation.