gms | German Medical Science

121. Kongress der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Chirurgie

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Chirurgie

27. bis 30.04.2004, Berlin

Silvadene®-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa numbers infecting partial thickness (IIb) burn wounds are reduced by local gene therapy expressing lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP)

Vortrag

  • presenting/speaker Lars-Uwe Lahoda - Klinik fuer Plastische, Hand- und Wiederherstellungschirurgie, Med.Hochschule Hannover, Deutschland; Department of General Surgery, Trauma/Burn Research Lab, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor USA
  • R.D. Klein - Department of General Surgery, Trauma/Burn Research Lab, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor USA
  • P.M. Vogt - Klinik fuer Plastische, Hand- und Wiederherstellungschirurgie, Med.Hochschule Hannover, Deutschland
  • W.M. Kuzon - Department of Plastic Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor USA
  • G.L. Su - Department of General Surgery, Trauma/Burn Research Lab, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor USA
  • S.C. Wang - Department of General Surgery, Trauma/Burn Research Lab, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor USA

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Chirurgie. 121. Kongress der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Chirurgie. Berlin, 27.-30.04.2004. Düsseldorf, Köln: German Medical Science; 2004. Doc04dgch0314

Die elektronische Version dieses Artikels ist vollständig und ist verfügbar unter: http://www.egms.de/de/meetings/dgch2004/04dgch648.shtml

Veröffentlicht: 7. Oktober 2004

© 2004 Lahoda et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielf&aauml;ltigt, verbreitet und &oauml;ffentlich zug&aauml;nglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

Text

Introduction

LPS-Binding-Protein (LBP), a class I acute phase protein, is capable of enhancing inflammatory cytokine production in response to LPS (lipopolysaccharide, endotoxin). It also functions as an opsonin for Gram-negative bacteria and reduces by 10,000-fold the concentration of neutrophil derived BPI (bactericidal permeability increasing protein) necessary to kill Gram-negative bacteria. Wound infection after thermal injury is a major source of morbidity and mortality. By increasing LBP at the site of burn injury we anticipate increased wound bactericidal activity by potentiating neutrophil and macrophage recruitment, activation and bactericidal killing, therefore we hypothesize that increasing levels of LBP by means of local gene therapy leads to decreased bacterial infection in burn injury.

Materials and methods

13 female inbred LBP-knockout (LBPko) mice and 13 age- and weight-matched pathogen-free C57b wild-type (C57BL6) mice received a 25% body surface partial thickness (IIb) burn wound. Postburn the burn area received intradermal injection of 1010 pfu of designed adenoviral constructs expressing either rat-LBP or beta-galactosidase (control). After 72 hrs 105 Silvadene®-resistant P.aeruginosa were topically applied and occlusively covered. Another 72 hrs later, the animals were sacrificed, the treated skin was harvested for histology and quantitative bacterial cultures.

Results

In wild-type animals (C57BL6), treatment with LBP-adenovirus resulted in significantly lower bacterial counts than animals treated with the control adenovirus (p<.04, Table). Overall, bacterial counts were reduced 44.3 fold. Histology, Western blotting and X-gal staining revealed efficacy of the experimental design and viral expression.

Conclusion

Our findings demonstrate that local gene therapy-driven over-expression of LPS-binding-protein (LBP) can suppress bacterial infection within burn wounds. These findings confirm LBP's importance in host immune defense against Gram-negative infection and support a possible feasibility of local gene therapy for the treatment of burn injuries.

[Fig. 1]